Florida Court Sentences Factoring Company Attorney for Forging Judges’ Signatures on ‘Orders’ Involving Transfers of Settlement Payments

Florida Court Sentences Factoring Company Attorney for Forging Judges’ Signatures on ‘Orders’ Involving Transfers of Settlement Payments

One-hundred and eleven and three-hundred and sixty-four.

One-hundred and eleven is the number of times that Jose Manuel Camacho Jr. was alleged to have forged the signatures of Broward County, Florida, judges on documents that he passed off as “orders” – orders approving transfers of structured settlement payment rights.

Three-hundred and sixty-four is the number of days that Camacho was sentenced to spend in county jail, when he was sentenced in August, after pleading guilty to 14 counts of forgery – a sentence that also includes 10 years of probation.

Camacho represented factoring company for a number of years, including several years, starting in 2012, when the forgeries were alleged to have occurred.  He was disbarred in 2016, and was reported in a Law360 article as having told prosecutors in a disciplinary hearing that he forged the signatures when his factoring company clients “were pressuring him” to obtain orders approving transfers of structured settlement payment rights.

Law360 reported on the sentencing in an article here, but incorrectly reported that the orders involving the creation of structured settlements, rather than the secondary market for payments under existing structured settlements.  The Florida Structured Settlement Protection Act – like statutes in 48 other states – provides that when a structured settlement payee is considering selling the right to future payments, the transaction is not effective unless it is reviewed and approved by court order.  The fabricated “orders” at issue in the Camacho investigation were such SSPA orders.

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